Select Theft / Robbery Results

Theft and robbery involve many different types of circumstances, each involving the unpermitted taking of another's property, even if for just a short period of time. The cases include petty theft, such as shoplifting, all the way to armed robbery, where intimidation, force and weapons are used. Petty theft, a misdemeanor, is stealing items with a value under $900, the California statutory limit separating it from grand theft. Other types of theft cases include identity theft, receiving stolen property and burglary. Whatever the charge, our office has the experience in handling your type of case with skill and proficiency.

For your convenience we have categorized our Theft & Robbery results to give our reader a clearer understanding of the cases our firm has handled previously.

Complete List of Select Theft / Robbery Results

If you want to read summaries of any of our firm’s selected theft or robbery cases, click on the following case summaries for a detailed description of each case.

  1. Rancho Palos Verdes, Shoplifting at Ralph's, Case Dismissed

  2. Torrance, Grand Theft of Sears by Employee, Dismissed

  3. Bellflower, Commercial Burglary (PC 459), Case Dismissed

  4. Marina Del Rey, Shoplifting, Costco, Diversion, Dismissal

  5. Torrance, Shoplifting at Kohl's, Civil Compromise Dismissal

  6. San Pedro, Receiving Stolen Cell Phone, Case Not Filed

  7. Manhattan Beach, Felony Grand Theft by Employee, No File

  8. Beverly Hills, Shoplifting at Trader Joe's, Case Dismissed

  9. Torrance, Delayed Entry of Judgment and Then Dismissal

  10. Torrance, Misdemeanor Petty Theft, Plea to Infraction

  11. Manhattan Beach, Shoplifting at Fry's, Plea to Infraction

  12. Hawthorne, Shoplifting at Costco, Plea to Infraction PC 415(2)

  13. Rancho Cucamonga, Grand Theft, Costco, Plea to PC 415

  14. Gardena, Felony Robberies Using Craig's List, Multiple Defendants

  15. Whittier, Theft of Over $220,000 From Employer, Five Years

  16. El Monte, Check Kiting, Client Had Priors, 90 Days

  17. Long Beach, Grand Theft Auto, Prior Strike, Probation

  18. LAX Airport, Airline Employee Steals Over $100,000, 1 Year

  19. Airport Courthouse, Auto Burglary, 60 Days Community Service

  20. Lomita, Theft of Computers from Police Post at Night

  21. Bellflower, Shoplifting, Sephora, Civil Compromise Dismissal

  22. Rolling Hills Estates, Shoplifting, Plea to Infraction 490.1

  23. Inglewood, Shoplifting at Michael's, Case Dismissed

  24. Manhattan Beach, Shoplifting $2249 of Items, No Jail

  25. Torrance, Shoplifting Jewelry at JCPenney, Case Dismissed

  26. Gardena, Tampering with a Vehicle (VC 10852), Infraction

  27. Torrance, Client Age 67, Shoplifting at Macy's, Dismissed

  28. Torrance, Shoplifting at Macy's, Case Dismissed on Motion

  29. LAX Baggage Handler Found with 325 Missing Items at Home

  30. Torrance, Grand Theft of $241,000 From Employer, Probation

  31. El Camino College Area, Stealing Traffic Signal, Diversion

  32. Torrance, Client a Sheriff, Defrauding an Innkeeper, No Jail

  33. Long Beach, Receipt of Over $42K in Unemployment Benefits

  34. Gardena, Shoplifting at Albertson's, Case Dismissed

  35. Manhattan Beach, Shoplifting $1750 at Macy's, No Jail

  36. Torrance, Receiving Stolen Laptop (PC 496), Case Not Filed

  37. Downtown LA, Identity Theft, Over $200,000 Taken, 7 Years

  38. Pasadena, Shoplifting at Target, Plea to Trespassing, $100

  39. Pasadena, Theft of iPads From Toys 'R Us, Formal Probation

  40. Torrance, Client Shoplifts $195 in Items From Walmart

  41. Torrance, Shoplifting at JCPenney, AB2124 Diversion Granted

  42. Torrance, Shoplifting at Walmart, AB2124 Diversion Granted

  43. Lakewood, Client Shoplifts $492 in Items, Case Dismissed

  44. Van Nuys, Client Shoplifts 79 Items From Michael's, Diversion Granted

  45. Banning, Shoplifting From Outlet Mall, Diversion Granted

  46. Torrance, Shoplifting at JCPenney, Diversion & Dismissal

  47. Fullerton, Shoplifting From Costco, Client Age 59, Diversion

  48. Torrance, Client Breaks into 16 Cars, Steals Various Items

  49. Compton, Shoplifting at Carson JCPenney, Judicial Diversion

  50. Manhattan Beach Shoplifting From Sephora, Judicial Diversion

  51. Torrance, Shoplifting at JCPenney, Judicial Diversion

  52. Downey, 2 Clients Shoplift at JCPenney, Judicial Diversion

  53. Del Amo Mall Shoplifting, Judicial Diversion, Two Clients

  54. Redondo Beach, Second Time Shoplifting, Macy’s, No Jail

  55. Downey, Shoplifting $41 at Target, Fight, DA Diversion
  56. Los Angeles, Shoplifting $309 in Clothes, Diversion, Dismissal
  57. Airport Courthouse, Defrauding a Shopkeeper, Dismissal
  58. Bellflower, Doctor Shoplifting from Costco, DA Diversion
  59. Downey, Shoplifting at JC Penney, DA Diversion, Dismissal
  60. Airport Court, 2nd Degree Robbery (P.C. § 212.5), No Jail
  61. Redondo Beach, Shoplifting with Magnet, Judicial Diversion
  62. Shoplifting, Torrance, Client Age 18, Judicial Diversion
  63. Second-Time Shoplifting, Downey, Immigration Issues
  64. Westminster Court, Shoplifting at Sephora, Diversion
  65. Long Beach, Grand Theft (PC 487) of a Generator, Probation
  66. Redondo Beach Shoplifting, Macy’s, Judicial Diversion
  67. Manhattan Beach, Third Strike Residential Burglary, 7 Years

Perhaps no crime other than a sex offense has the long-lasting negative consequences and stigma as a conviction for a theft offense. Indeed, theft is a crime of moral turpitude. It signals dishonesty and the ability to deceive another for selfish personal gain despite the law and ethical fundamentals.

Accordingly, it has special significance for potential employers, citizenship eligibility, college applications and applications to rent housing.

For these reasons, we at Greg Hill & Associates take these cases perhaps more seriously than even our clients. We understand that the prosecutor often believes our client has committed the offense many times over successfully before finally being stopped. Therefore, it is not uncommon to encounter a prosecutor who is more zealous than usual.

The case may be a simple shoplifting offense or a more complex accounting fraud or even a strong arm robbery. Regardless, it is imperative from our perspective to identify the evidence that is helpful to our case and plan our defense strategically to always maintain credibility with the prosecutor.

Sometimes, the client confesses to police and is well documented on a store security tape. In such cases, it is more important to look at “damage control” than fighting the facts. We consequently often recommend that the client immediately take an online shoplifting prevention course offered at the National Association of Shoplifting Prevention or Tom Wilson Counseling Center. If the client then brings us the certificate of completion, we may gain some traction in negotiating a plea bargain that is fair and remove the zeal from a prosecutor’s approach.

In Los Angeles County, as of January 1, 2015, there is a new pilot program effective until January 1, 2020 that allows a judge, over the prosecutor’s objection, to order diversion for qualifying individuals, mostly low-level misdemeanors such a shoplifting. If the client successfully completes the program, he or she may ask the judge to withdraw their plea and dismiss the complaint. The program is called AB 2124 and provided for at Penal Code §§ 1001.94 to 1001.98. An attorney may seek this program by filing a motion for imposition of diversion. We have done this and had such motions granted.

On more serious cases, Proposition 47 allows certain felony offenses involving less than $950 in value to be reclassified as a misdemeanor, which is effective in reducing the maximum time an individual would face in prison or county jail. It also helps shift the case out of felony court to misdemeanor court and may make probation more likely.

Certain theft and robbery cases are too serious for reduction under Proposition 47. The charges may involve residential burglary, which is a strike offense, robbery with the use of a weapon and embezzlement or theft involving thousands of dollars. Depending upon the client’s criminal history and the case facts, various motions may be appropriate to file to help the client and improve the plea bargain. The may include a Romero motion to strike a strike on the client’s criminal history for purposes of sentencing, a Pitchess motion to reveal the officers personnel history of falsifying documents, coercing confessions and racial profiling, as well as a motion for discovery to get a court order for the prosecution to produce documents that it is withholding.

Contact us.

Client Reviews
Thank you so much for putting so much effort in this case. We really appreciate it and we are happy that all turned out well.
★★★★★
Greg Hill did an outstanding job on every level. He was efficient, thorough, knowledgeable, courteous, responsive & brilliant. He welcomed my input and my concerns. . . from the first conversation to the last - I always felt 'it mattered' to him. S.C., Rolling Hills Estates
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Thanks again for your hard work. We want you to know that we are very appreciative of all that you have done [on our son's] behalf. With warmest regards, L.H., Torrance
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Dear Greg, Thank you again for all your help. Your professionalism and thoroughness is greatly admired. I will definitely recommend you to my friends if they ever need legal help. V.L., Carson
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Thanks for investing in my case. I talked to other attorneys out there and they had an arms-length of attitude, but not you. Your intensity and interest helped a lot. C.R., Pomona
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